Tagged with problem finding

Preserving the Wonder Within

Preserving the Wonder Within

It doesn’t take long watching any type of media to be reminded that we change as we get older. There is no shortage of products claiming to help us preserve our youth–dyes for our hair, creams for our wrinkles, and any number of prescriptions about which we are charged to “ask our doctors.” But perhaps … Continue reading

A More Beautiful Question 2

A More Beautiful Question 2

It seems questioning is in the air. Years ago, when I talked about helping students ask questions I was often met with “And when do you think we have time to do that?” stares. And given our educational climate, there were good reasons. But times shift. I’m told that my naturally curly hair is going … Continue reading

Students as Questioners 5: Questions in the Disciplines

Students as Questioners 5: Questions in the Disciplines

One of the three keys I’ve identified for supporting creativity in the classroom is teaching the creative methodologies of the disciplines you are teaching. “Teaching the creative methodologies” is a fancy phrase for the idea that, whatever subject you are teaching, you teach not just the “what” of the subject but the “how” as well. … Continue reading

Students as Questioners 2: Make Just One Change

Students as Questioners 2: Make Just One Change

Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana’s book, Make Just One Change, suggests the one strategy that will transform education is teaching students to ask their own questions. Interestingly, their journey to this conclusion began, not with students, but with parents. Working with parents in a dropout prevention program in the 1980s, the authors repeatedly heard from … Continue reading

Students as Questioners 1: What’s a Question?

Students as Questioners 1: What’s a Question?

Questions. We ask them when we need directions. We ask them when we don’t understand. Sometimes we ask questions in outrage, other times we ask them in curiosity and wonder. Sometimes questions are rhetorical, other times they are urgent. If we want to help students be questioners, we need to help them understand the types … Continue reading

Color Changing Milk: Think Like a Scientist

Color Changing Milk: Think Like a Scientist

Teaching students to “think like a scientist” is a tricky thing. Many of us have experienced science classes that required memorizing seemingly irrelevant from ancient textbooks. On the other hand, other activities include spectacular demonstrations or hands-on activities, but do not lead students to scientific understanding, operating more than a magic show than a lesson. … Continue reading

Why Does Popcorn Jump?

Why Does Popcorn Jump?

For me, it started with popcorn. I discovered The New York Times ScienceTake video explaining the physics behind the glorious dance of the popcorn kernel, and I was entranced. Sadly, I can’t manage to get the video to embed, so you are going to have to Click here to see it. I know, it’s annoying. … Continue reading

Kenneth Shinozuka, Problem Finder

Kenneth Shinozuka, Problem Finder

Do you know someone with Alzheimer’s Disease? If you do, you’ll wish you lived across the street from this remarkable young man. 15-year-old Kenneth Shinozuka followed in the footsteps of many great inventors when he looked at a problem near to his heart and was spurred to action. He is a fine example of real-world … Continue reading

M I Curious? You Bet!

M I Curious? You Bet!

The M I Curious series on my local Public Radio station is a cooperative exercise in problem finding. Modeled after the Curious City series at WBEZ in Chicago, M I Curious asks, “What do you wonder?” It invites listeners to submit questions, puts the questions to a vote, and then selects those for investigation. It … Continue reading