Filed under Interdisciplinary Teaching

Ready, Set, School!

Ready, Set, School!

I know that in other parts of the country, school is already in full swing, but here in Michigan we are enjoying the last few days of summer before the academic year starts in earnest. Teachers are preparing their rooms, buying way-too-many supplies out of their own pockets, and planning those vital early lessons. During … Continue reading

Everything is Alive

Everything is Alive

Like so many other people, I‘ve needed to get out of the house throughout the pandemic. And, again, like so many others, I’ve been walking. I walk around my neighborhood, with occasional excursions to local parks to meet friends or have a change of scenery. But mostly, I walk the same routes, and I need … Continue reading

Create a Festival

Create a Festival

The Beer Festival is back in Ypsilanti, Michigan. In most ways, this doesn’t matter to me at all. I’m not a beer drinker and my tolerance for crowds is greatly diminished after more than two years of pandemic. But still, the notion of any kind of festival is a joyous jolt of normalcy. Our county … Continue reading

Rapping Creativity

Rapping Creativity

Recently I was heading to my back yard with a 5-year-old friend, and she dropped a ball, which then bounced down the steps to the lawn. She looked at me and without missing a beat, she said, in perfect rhythm: What’s that bouncing down the deck? A ball, a ball! Oh, what the heck. It … Continue reading

Creativity and Resilience

Creativity and Resilience

In creativity, as in all of life, beliefs and emotions matter. When individuals feel confident in their ability to work creatively, they are more likely to undertake creative projects and stick to them when times get tough. Teachers who have confidence in their own creativity are more likely to teach to support students’ creativity—and find … Continue reading

Giving Students a Voice: Podcast!

Giving Students a Voice: Podcast!

Ever since I started teaching, back in the misty annals of time, I’ve tried to give students options for sharing ideas. My students, from elementary to graduate school, have written reports (of course), created poetry, acted out scenarios, built art works or models, composed music, recorded radio dramas, made charts and diagrams, etc. etc. Each … Continue reading

French Toast Alerts

French Toast Alerts

Apparently, in Boston, this week has been full of French Toast alerts. I’m not sure when the French Toast Alert system was created, but it surely must have been after my years living in New England, otherwise I can’t imagine missing such a delicious weather warning. According to Boston’s Universal Hub, the French Toast Alert … Continue reading

Real Work, Real World, and Creativity

Real Work, Real World, and Creativity

I have a friend who, together with her quadriplegic husband, raised four wonderful children. Those “children” are now adults with not-so-young children of their own, and I continue to be impressed with their intelligence, integrity, and persistence in the face of obstacles. My friend and I have talked over the years about the things that … Continue reading

Creative Archeology: Motel of the Mysteries

Creative Archeology: Motel of the Mysteries

When I was a child, I loved the story of archeologist Howard Carter uncovering King Tut’s tomb. I could easily envision his face as he first peered within and glimpsed the treasures inside, exclaiming that he saw “Things, wonderful things!” These words are echoed by fictional archeologist Howard Carson in David Macaulay’s 1979 book, Motel … Continue reading

Frank Pahl: Creating with Sound

Frank Pahl: Creating with Sound

What makes sound? What makes music? If you’d like to explore these questions, and perhaps set your students on a summer quest, consider Frank Pahl. Frank Pahl is a Michigan musician and composer who works with automatic music, or music created using automatic instruments. Automatic instruments don’t require a human to directly operate them, like … Continue reading