Common Core Principle #1: The Standards are not the Whole Curriculum.

applecoreThese are the Common Core State Standards. They are not the whole apple. If we limit what we teach to exactly what is in the Core documents, students will miss out on important experiences and ideas—to say nothing of most of social studies, world languages, physical education, and the arts! The “What is Not Covered by the Standards” list addresses this specifically.

While the Standards make references to some particular forms of content…they do not—indeed, cannot—enumerate all or even most of the content that students should learn. The Standards must therefore be complemented by a well-developed, content-rich curriculum… (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010, p. 6)

When considering additional content supportive of creativity, think both about disciplines that are absent from explicit mention in the Common Core (for example, world languages or arts) but also about the investigative methodologies of any disciplines being taught. Remember, students should learn both the key concepts of the disciplines, but also the ways professionals in various fields develop and investigate questions.

Creativity and the Common Core

Creativity and the Common Core Principle #2: The Standards Don’t Tell You How to Teach

Creativity and the Common Core Principle#3: The Standards Don’t Tell You What Students Should Do with the Content

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