Filed under Creativity and Learning

Carrots, Mindfulness, and Creativity

Carrots, Mindfulness, and Creativity

My sister ate a carrot this week. That might not sound like much, but because her immune system has been compromised, fresh fruits and vegetables have been deemed too dangerous in recent days—until now. Family and friends celebrated by filling her Facebook spaces with pictures of salads, carrot-crunching rabbits, and cheers. Needless to say, she … Continue reading

Creativity and Curriculum: What Do We Teach?

Creativity and Curriculum: What Do We Teach?

“I don’t have time to think about creativity. Look at the amount of curriculum I have to cover this year. No time for anything else!” Ever felt like that? I suspect most teachers have. Fortunately, it is not an either-or choice. Really, it’s not. Creativity is not something extra to be pulled out late Friday … Continue reading

Why Creativity?

Why Creativity?

Why, in the midst of end-of-term grading, holiday preparations, and even (I can’t believe it) preparing for new courses that start January 4, why take the time to write about creativity? And since your lives are probably just as crazy, why take time to read about it? I thought about that today, as I dashed … Continue reading

Business Research Comes to School

Business Research Comes to School

I will admit I’ve frequently railed against using business models to design and evaluate schools. There are so many ways schools and businesses are different that attempting to translate one to the other risks assuming children are some kind of consistent raw material that can be transformed into a uniform product. I can see teachers … Continue reading

The Default Network Comes to School

The Default Network Comes to School

For the last week I’ve been thinking about daydreaming. Or, to be more accurate, I’ve been thinking about the brain’s “default network,” the work it does, and how it might fit into schools. In my last post I described the default network, the parts of the brain that are active when we are not consciously … Continue reading

The Progress Principle Comes to School (or Not)

The Progress Principle Comes to School (or Not)

It is sad, but perhaps not unexpected, that since I recently wrote about discouraged educators, I’ve spent a lot of time coaching a young teacher friend. She’s trying to find her way through an interaction with an administrator that has her questioning whether she belongs in public education at all. The specifics don’t matter because … Continue reading