Tagged with problem finding lessons

Why Does Popcorn Jump?

Why Does Popcorn Jump?

For me, it started with popcorn. I discovered The New York Times ScienceTake video explaining the physics behind the glorious dance of the popcorn kernel, and I was entranced. Sadly, I can’t manage to get the video to embed, so you are going to have to Click here to see it. I know, it’s annoying. … Continue reading

Kenneth Shinozuka, Problem Finder

Kenneth Shinozuka, Problem Finder

Do you know someone with Alzheimer’s Disease? If you do, you’ll wish you lived across the street from this remarkable young man. 15-year-old Kenneth Shinozuka followed in the footsteps of many great inventors when he looked at a problem near to his heart and was spurred to action. He is a fine example of real-world … Continue reading

M I Curious? You Bet!

M I Curious? You Bet!

The M I Curious series on my local Public Radio station is a cooperative exercise in problem finding. Modeled after the Curious City series at WBEZ in Chicago, M I Curious asks, “What do you wonder?” It invites listeners to submit questions, puts the questions to a vote, and then selects those for investigation. It … Continue reading

Be An Explorer of the World

Be An Explorer of the World

Ever wonder how creative people come up with their ideas? Me, too. So many times I look at a new invention, artistic endeavor, or form of literature and think, “How did they ever imagine doing that in the first place?” That is why I am fascinated with problem finding—the processes by which individuals choose the … Continue reading

Two Great Questions: Math Style

Two Great Questions: Math Style

Sometimes it can be easy to think, “Creativity is fine for art class or writing, but not math. Creativity in math is for Einstein, not middle school.” If you’ve ever been tempted to think such thoughts, take 5 minutes and watch Annie Fetter at an NCTM Ignite session. She describes a math lesson based on … Continue reading

Math in the News

Math in the News

Math in the News is exactly what it sounds like—a website, with related weekly newsletter—that uses math to explore issues in the news. Produced by Media4Math, Math in the News activities range from probability maps predicting landfall for Hurricane Sandy to an exploration of pumpkin costs per hundredweight or the statistics of the presidential election. … Continue reading