Matches for: “problem finding” …

Color Changing Milk: Think Like a Scientist

Color Changing Milk: Think Like a Scientist

Teaching students to “think like a scientist” is a tricky thing. Many of us have experienced science classes that required memorizing seemingly irrelevant from ancient textbooks. On the other hand, other activities include spectacular demonstrations or hands-on activities, but do not lead students to scientific understanding, operating more than a magic show than a lesson. … Continue reading

Camp Google

Camp Google

I was going to start my blog vacation today, but I couldn’t resist one more post to share this: Camp Google. How’s this for problem finding? Camp Google is a free online camp, focused on children ages 7-10–and it starts July 13.  While activities (obviously) start online, they are designed to get kids up and … Continue reading

When Do We Play?

When Do We Play?

Play is important.  Why else would it be so consistent across the human and animal worlds? When we had kittens in our house, the two of them found the world a continual source of adventure. They stalked one another with delight, dove into our shoes just for the sake of popping back out, and chased … Continue reading

Are You Bored? Brilliant?

Are You Bored? Brilliant?

What would life be like if you used your phone a little less? Would you be bored? Brilliant? That’s the question posed by the podcasters at New Tech City in their Bored and Brilliant project, subtitled “The Lost Art of Spacing Out.” The podcast suggests that we have a need for boredom—a quiet space for … Continue reading

Toys from Trash: Arvind Gupta’s Science

Toys from Trash: Arvind Gupta’s Science

Arvind Gupta is one of those people every educator should know. Wonder why? Take a look. Gupta believes that children learn best by touching, feeling, cutting, sticking — pulling things apart, putting things together. And he’s devoted his career to providing children all over the work with the inspiration and tools to do so.  And … Continue reading

New Year’s Resolutions for September Part 1

New Year’s Resolutions for September Part 1

I’ve never been good at traditional New Year’s Resolutions. Somehow, coming on the heels of the most intense time of year—when holiday and end-of-semester craziness merge—by January 1 I’m more inclined to be grateful for survival than set new goals. But September is different. Even when I’m teaching summer term, the end of August brings … Continue reading

M I Curious? You Bet!

M I Curious? You Bet!

The M I Curious series on my local Public Radio station is a cooperative exercise in problem finding. Modeled after the Curious City series at WBEZ in Chicago, M I Curious asks, “What do you wonder?” It invites listeners to submit questions, puts the questions to a vote, and then selects those for investigation. It … Continue reading

How Do We Measure Winter?

How Do We Measure Winter?

It has been quite a winter in Michigan, and across the central and eastern United States. Newscasters are having fun describing the many ways in which this winter has been exceptional. This, of course, brings to mind the question, “How do you measure winter?” I know it is an odd question to consider at the … Continue reading